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Airline Size Guide for Checked Luggage

It seems the restrictions for carry-on luggage get stricter and stricter every day. If your bag is too big or too heavy, you may have to check it at the gate - and that can get really expensive.

Luckily, most airlines still allow one checked bag without additional fees. But they still put a lot of restrictions on the size, weight and contents of your checked luggage.

Read on for tips and advice from the experts at ROAM Luggage on how to make sure your luggage is ready to be checked in seamlessly. Then relax and enjoy a worry-free flight without struggling to get your bag in an overhead bin.



Size It Right

Even though you're not taking your larger luggage into the airplane cabin, airlines still regulate the size and weight allowances for checked bags. Verify the specifics for your airline - and for your ticket type, as some economy fares have stricter guidelines - when you're booking your flight. In general, most domestic airlines go with 27 inches x 21 inches x 14 inches (69 centimeters x 53 centimeters x 36 centimeters) as a basic parameter for checked bags. Don't go crazy cramming that hard-shell case chock-full, though, as the weight limit hovers around 50 pounds. Exceeding those guidelines can result in hefty "extra bag" fees.



Lock It Up

Your checked luggage will still be screened, may be opened by Transportation Security Administration agents doing their jobs and could be subject to some rough handling. So it's important to travel with a sturdy, hard-sided case that includes a TSA-approved lock and waterproof features. Luggage like this will weather the bumpy flight better and protect your gear from damage and theft. Additionally, choosing a high-quality case that is customized to your color and design preferences will make spotting your bag amid a sea of black cases on the baggage carousel much easier. Don't forget to put your complete contact information both inside your suitcase and on an external ID tag, just in case something goes awry.

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Leave It Out

Though most airlines allow a lot more in a checked bag than they do in a carry-on, there are still restrictions to keep in mind. For example, firearms and lithium batteries must be stowed in a carryon bag, but any liquids that exceed 3.4 ounces will have to go in a checked bag. Medical devices, duty-free purchases, sports equipment and some common household items have specific regulations both from the TSA and from specific airlines. Check the guidelines, call if you have questions - and consider whether you really need to bring certain things with you. Sometimes it's best to leave it out and buy, borrow or rent at your destination.



Final Thoughts

Checking a suitcase and walking onto an airplane baggage-free can make traveling a relaxing and enjoyable experience. But, like every other aspect of air travel, it takes some planning. Consider these expert packing tips from ROAM Luggage, then design the custom case that expresses your personality, accommodates your needs and gets you roaming in style.